The Hunting Stories Podcast

Ep 068 The Hunting Stories Podcast: Ted Nugent

September 25, 2023 The Hunting Stories Podcast Episode 68
The Hunting Stories Podcast
Ep 068 The Hunting Stories Podcast: Ted Nugent
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Don't miss Uncle Ted's insightful commentary on deer hunting, archery, and wildlife management. As he shares his perspective on the importance of balancing the deer population and the necessity of harvesting the surplus, you'll gain a whole new understanding of hunting ethics. Whether you're an avid hunter or a fan of engaging narratives, this episode promises to offer you a fresh perspective on hunting, family, and life itself. So pull up a chair, sit back, and let Uncle Ted take you on an unforgettable journey.

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Speaker 1:

Howdy folks and welcome to the Hunting Stories podcast. I'm your host, michael, and we've got a great one for you today. Today we connect with the Motor City Madman Uncle Ted, some people call him. Today I just call him Ted Nugent, so I want to say thank you to Ted for coming on the podcast. I was wonderful speaking with him. He obviously has a ton of passion and he came in super hot. Normally I get like a quick chat with the person before we even start recording, but Ted was like nope, let's go, it's time to get this thing started. And we did exactly that. So, ted, thank you again. I really do appreciate you, your passion, what you've done for hunting as a whole over the many years that you've been doing it and, of course, just for sharing some stories with us today. So that's it, guys. Let's go ahead and kick this thing off and let Ted tell you some of his stories.

Speaker 1:

Perfect, perfect. Well, ted, thank you so much for joining the podcast man.

Speaker 2:

I really appreciate it Well anything that has to do with the great outdoor stimuli and God's miraculous creation is a hands on participant. I'm here for it.

Speaker 1:

Perfect, perfect, sir. Well, I think you. If you know the name of the podcast, it's the Hunting Stories podcast. So you're going to do the heavy lifting today and I'm super excited about it. All we want to do is hear your favorite hunting stories. It's pretty easy.

Speaker 2:

You have a thousand hours? Do you have thousands of hours? You got to realize I'm in my 75th hunting season right now. Wow, and I'm so giddy I can hardly stand myself. Yeah, hunting stories. You know.

Speaker 2:

I was born in 1948 in Detroit, when Michigan was really the number one hunting state in the nation. Pheasant was king. All the deer were up north. There were no deer south of Claire pretty much the mid mid southern peninsula and I was at deer camp at 10 months old.

Speaker 2:

In the fall of 1949. It was an annual ritual at the Nugent family. My dad was already a follower of Fred Bear when I was born. He came out of the World War II and the Korean insanity and it was insane.

Speaker 2:

And so this is I as I wake up every morning in the fall of 2023. You know, nobody has ever listened to Ted Nugent talk and went away and went. Jesus, I wonder what he meant. I mean, I'm not him.

Speaker 2:

I've got this English language down to a pretty good efficiency, but I am helpless to find adequate verbiage to describe the excitement level, the tradition, the euphoria, the challenge, the stimuli, the happiness that I'm having right now as I enter my 75th birthday, going all the way back to following my dad in the north woods of Michigan with my little fiber glass I think was a blue fiberglass bow, shooting 140 grain field points that we got from Miller's feed store on Grand River in Detroit.

Speaker 2:

You could literally buy a breath a beautiful handmade Port Orifords cedar shaft after the hunting season with the big heavy 140 grain that matched most of the broadheads back then, particularly the bear razor hood, and you could get those for 10 cents apiece the whole world. So I these are vivid, vivid, powerful, dynamic memories of mine because I've been clean and sober for 75 years so the brain still works, not to be confused with those so called peers in my music industry or pretty much around the world. But but Mike, the, the the original memories of traipsing through the woods with that little bow and arrow, my dad, I got my dad's bow right here. It's a long, it's amazing that's a fiberglass wood. It was 62 pounds at a 28 inch draw and I still out and use it very much.

Speaker 1:

or is it sort of decoration at this point?

Speaker 2:

I don't think anybody needs to shoot a 62 pound bow maybe. But and I got some of my original bear bows here. In fact I'm in the. I wish we had visual, because not only am I really good looking this morning, but I'm so by hundreds of thousands of rounds of ammo, thousands of arrows, thousands of broadheads, hundreds of bows, hundreds of guns and enough horsepower. You can probably see I got enough horsepower there to snap a face. So my, my hunting stories I suppose I could just pick one of any year. I remember the. The Newgent family would head north on I-75. There was a two lane back then and we had a, a Ford station wagon, and I remember we I always put my bow and my back quarter of arrows in the window, because the real excitement was when we would occasionally pass another vehicle that also had their bows and arrows visual.

Speaker 2:

I would just go crazy Look, there's somebody else got, and I'd wave, and so we run a little cabin on the Tittabawassee River not far from Fred Bear's original Bear Archery shack in Grayling, and it was a log structure with a wood stove and a hand pump. And I think the most powerful celebration in my life is that I was forced I eat, disciplined I eat, parented to be in to my family, gather wood, gather water, learn to be stealthy, which I failed. For the first 16 years of I was a fumbling, bumbling idiot with hence the madman. The motor city madman doesn't have to be slow and stealthy and conscientious. The motor city madman can just go ahead and rip dangerous fire, breathing licks off his guitar high energy. But to transform from the Chuck Berry fan because I was already playing guitar by the time I was six or seven years old to the what I discovered by I'm I'm gonna say 54, 1954, 1955, 67 years old that Fred Bear was my Chuck Berry of the bow and arrow and I got to meet Fred.

Speaker 2:

So one of the great stories is in those early years we'd stop at a little off yellow cinder block shack on the outskirts of Grayling and again I was just a little kid, I didn't know nothing, I just knew that I couldn't wait to go out in the woods along the Rouge River in Detroit which was loaded with game pheasants and quail and squirrels and ducks and geese and coons and possums and skunks and fox and river rats and beavers and musk rats and I mean it was just a fascinating world for me. And when I met this tall, lanky guy in this fret, in this bear archery shack there was Nells Grumley. I don't know if you know the name, nells Grumley, but he was Fred's original boy. Or in Detroit, as as Fred came from Pennsylvania, then they moved up north to become bow and arrow and accessory manufacturers full time. I met these guys and these guys were talking the founding fathers, yeah of modern bow hunting. And I just remember as a wild eyed kid that was fascinated if I had two or three arrows in my quiver. Here's Fred bear. I didn't know who he was but it imprinted on me that he was the bow and arrow guy because the shop was full of bows and arrows and God Mike.

Speaker 2:

And then eventually I met George Nichols who owned Jackson archery and Jackson Michigan, who made all of Fred's arrows and I got to hunt with. I got to hunt with, with George Nichols, who was the first guy to tag the first deer with the bow and arrow in the Alligan State Park. I believe it was November 1st experimental archery season, it was either. There was a letter from Fred bear that said they had the first experimental archery season in 37, 1937 in the UP. But, george, maybe that was a UP experimental, because George tagged the first deer with his you longbow, which I have right here the actual bow yes, I have his bow. George became a friend and a hunting partner and a guide for me, learning so much from my dad, from Fred, from George and from Bruce Gilpin that's an important name and Raleigh harms and Marv Leslie. These were the guys that were in that November 1st 1947 experimental season in the Alligan State Park. And I get Mike, I got to hunt with these guys, share campfires with these guys, communicated with Howard Hill and and and Doug Walker and hunted with Fred bear for over 40 years.

Speaker 2:

I mean, if I, if I weak of effervescence, it's because of those masters that I was able to glean some of their knowledge, their energy, their spirit, their, their wisdom, their talents. And so here I am at 75 and I've, I've, I have figured out how to apply all that positive energy from those masters and I do not buy chicken. I kill a lot of deer. I've hung up 11 already this year with my bow and so I could. I'm going all over the place because there's so many individual stories that in a an overview it's it's a never-ending story. But if I were to give you the most powerful of all and I remember the first year I remember my dad, I remember the cabin, I remember my family up there, I remember my cousin Mark. I remember hanging out with Fred and be invited to his rose city grouse Haven private hunting camp.

Speaker 2:

But I think the most moving that hunting story aficionados would appreciate is the blessings and the gift and the honor that I've been blessed with, that people who are dying, little boys and girls that are dying. Yeah, travis, a teenager, 1968 had leukemia, heard my radio interviews raving about the excitement of bow hunting and the outdoor high that I got because I avoided all the nonsense of peer pressure bullshit and I got high at God's creation as a participant. And this Travis kid got ahold of my book, an agent, and said before I die, I'm going to die here soon. Would Ted Nugent take me hunting? That's y'all. Yeah, that's heavy. That I mean it. Does it get any heavier. No, maybe Marcus Latrell has something heavier. But Marcus and I talk, and I share these stories with Marcus, and he says that this is heavier than his survival experience and and and terminating evil and surviving overwhelming evil.

Speaker 2:

So little Macon Lynn, six years old, dying of leukemia. I don't. How does a six year old know who Ted Nugent is? Well, he told that. Family told me they watched the spirit of the wild TV show and these kids get a kick out of it. Little Sylvia was seven years old and their last request in life were to go hunting with Ted Nugent. Well, how in God's name could I earn that? But somehow they determined that I did.

Speaker 2:

And those campfires, mike, I'm sure you'll have wonderful campfires in your life. Everybody listening will have moving, really joyous, celebratory, spiritual campfires with family and friends. But I'm afraid I've had the ultimate ones when I got strong and not cry around these campfires. These little kids asking me questions about music and Fred Bear yeah, so I could I. There's been a lot of those stories, but I think I would just like to emphasize that anybody listening to a hunting story podcast know, please know, how powerful this lifestyle we've chosen represents quality, responsibility, environmental stewardship, true conservation, and that those that may not be born into it and passed on from our family, and those that discover it at any given point in their life, that we know it's thrilling, we know it's fulfilling, we know it's the ultimate sport, because it's insanely challenging and demanding and disciplinary but that people who are facing death want to do that. Yeah, we should celebrate every campfire more more intensely From here on out.

Speaker 2:

I started when Travis got a hold me. I was only 19 at the time, I think, and I I hadn't thought about death, I hadn't thought about terminal illnesses. I was totally unaware of that. I was so into my music and touring and trying to find days in October, november, to go bullhunting that that's probably the most important story I can share with you is that what we do is Sacred. It is as close to God, it is as close to God's miracle, it is the most responsible Participation in God's miracle that even little children, not having been taught that or even heard about it they might have heard me talk on Spirit of the Wild TV. That's what most of the parents tell me, but it immediately imprints on people.

Speaker 1:

And I think.

Speaker 2:

I think that's the most important story of our lifestyle. I.

Speaker 1:

Agreed, ted. So I'm a new hunter. I've only been hunting for a handful of years and archery hunting for about five years, and Before that, you know whatever, I was playing video games and drinking beers and I didn't really had no agenda as to what I was doing with my life.

Speaker 2:

Oh, welcome to life, mike, welcome to the real life, mike. I gotta tell you, mike, I don't mean to keep interrupting, but I'm very excited about Exchanging experiences and ideas and beliefs and dreams. Do you know that there are, I know, thousands, but certainly tens of thousands of people that have started late? Yeah, they communicate with me on a non-stop basis, that they heard me do a rock and roll radio interview where I just went Wild, describing the intensity of my outdoor lifestyle and the mystical flight of the air, with the challenge of getting close to a creature that God created not to let you get close. And and people have gone cheese. I thought you were a coward for murdering innocent animals. And then I watched your spear the wild TV show and now I'm an addicted bow hunter. So welcome to the party. What, what inspired you? I think the listeners would love to know him. Maybe you've talked about it before, but I've heard so many variations of what got people into it later in life. What, what finally pulled the trigger for you?

Speaker 1:

Yeah. So when it started with hunting, I had no interest, never thought about it, but my brother-in-law and father-in-law did it and I was engaged with my wife and we were living in Washington at the time and she's like you should go hunting with them and I was like, ah, I guess, sure, why not? I smoke a lot of meat. Maybe I should know what it's like to take a life if I'm gonna eat meat.

Speaker 2:

Amen Amen.

Speaker 1:

Especially because I knew at the time knew more vegans than I did hunters. So I was like, well, let's see if these vegans have it, you know, let's see if I can do this, let's see if I can even pull the trigger so I go out with them. And if their camp was more about drinking beers and camaraderie, which I did definitely enjoy. But I moved to Colorado, actually was a hunt in Washington for elk Turned a corner. It was early October and this big old bull just starts bugling and I was like, oh my god, and we ended up putting an elk down that trip. But getting in there and I was able to pull the trigger, I didn't hesitate. It was just this Overwhelming moment where I'm like this is, this is what I want to do, this is what I would do the rest of my life.

Speaker 1:

Moved to Colorado, started hunting in the middle of the winter and I was like nope, switched to archery, just to switch to September because I didn't like the temperatures. And now I'm just completely addicted to archery hunting. In fact I've been doing for five years. I killed my first bull elk Two weeks ago with my bow and it was absolutely a moving experience. I'll share a video with you afterwards of because we caught the entire thing on camera of me actually putting the bull down and it was. It was super special. I'm gonna have a special episode with guys that took me out because they are very experienced hunters. Well, it's hard to find a mentor, so I eventually found some guys wanted to take me out and we got it done and it's just it's. It's beyond my family, it's everything to me, it's it's.

Speaker 2:

You're, you're. You're expounding and articulating what we all feel. Um, and I know that beer plays a big role in camp, not with me. I think I've had three in my life because I couldn't find a cold water when I was growl-sutting and it was delicious, by the way, better, better for you than a sugar drink. But did you kill that big horn ram behind you with your bow?

Speaker 1:

No, sir, that is, that is actually my father-in-law. He passed away this year and, as such, no one, no one wanted it. And I was like no, no, no, no, no, that that's coming with me. I would love to have it. And so he's uh, he's a Canadian and you know you can get tags pretty easy up there, and he put a couple down.

Speaker 1:

But this one is his favorite story and I've told it on the podcast before, but I'll give you a quick version of it. Basically, the curl has to be a certain distance for it to be leader, and my father-in-law, who's a big, who was a big fan of yours, by the way, it's too bad he's not here to know that I'm talking to you right now, but he, um, he, one of the curls is exactly what it needs to be. The other one is not. So him, just being a hell of a razor, like he is, takes it into the warden, like you're supposed to, and throws it down on the table, making sure the non legal side is up, and those guys start writing him a ticket and going after him for, and then he's like, oh, oh, flips that bad boy over and there's that perfect, uh curl that you need, and and so that's one of his favorite stories to tell. So I would make sure that that's always going to be in my office, that big horn.

Speaker 2:

Well, that's a great story and it's it's great man. And you know, the greatest hunters and the best people in the world are my blood brothers. You can call them fans, but they are my blood brothers and you'll find that when you get in a group of people you find the drooling slobs that are just nasty and negative. They don't like me, which is because they're on the whoopy, cushion, goldberg, joe biden side and all the good people that are on the fred bear side and on the spirit side and on the positive energy and being the best that you can be. Those are my friends and I have been a great man and and that animal that's what taxidermy is that. That is a reminder of who he was and what he meant to you and his dedication to conservation.

Speaker 2:

So that's why I've always been on a jihad to promote and celebrate how. I've never defended it. I don't defend truth, logic and common sense. I promote and celebrate it. And there's never been an interview as have been millions since 1965 with the amboy dukes. I do interviews all around the world constantly. I'll be doing some more here today and I always promote that spirit responsibility to balance the herd during god's natural season of harvest. So that's what that mount represents to you and to all of us that have animals mounted, and I think that's something that has been now completely misrepresented on purpose by the propaganda ministry that we call media nowadays. So were you born and raised in canada?

Speaker 2:

No, no, my wife was uh well she was born there and then she moved to texas.

Speaker 1:

And so my father-in-law had enough of the the politics in canada and he moved to texas when my wife was probably a year old, um, so she lived there or down here, because I'm in texas as well at this point. Um lived down here for years and years and years and she eventually moved up to Boulder, colorado, to go to school and that's where we met and, you know, rest his history. Now we're back in texas?

Speaker 2:

Are you mic new brunfels? Oh yeah, I know it. Well, man, sure, god bless real texas. But we're going through some real bad times in texas right now because I'm afraid that the texas parks and wildlife Is infested with anti hunters and they they actually have guys from new jersey that have Drag queen flags on their website that are in charge oh, your hunting in texas. J hunter reed is a gay guy from new jersey and I have nothing against gay guys. I got a bunch. I saw him write right, write songs with my friends of mine.

Speaker 2:

But when you turn into an anti hunter and you use your bureaucracy and abuse of power against the people who pay your salary, um, texas parks and wildlife is, is, is, is anti, non-texas, is any entity I've ever seen. And they're slaughtering deer and they're unethical and criminal because they're killing healthy deer and burying them, which is wanton waste of a precious wildlife resource, which is against the law in texas. It's against the law everywhere, except here in michigan, where you can shoot sand hill cranes, known as a ribeye in the sky, but the law in michigan says you can shoot them but you can't eat them, if your brain can process that Indecency. So that's why I'm a hellraiser and I'm a fighter, and you said your father-in-law was a hellraiser. No wonder is my blood brother. All these people should raise hell against corruption and criminality and abuse of power, and we happen to be Surrounded by it today. So I could give you some great hunting stories how I've confronted bureaucrats, and here's one when I was going um, I mean, it was the.

Speaker 2:

It was the rebirth of bow hunting. We had no idea what we were doing. We didn't move slow enough. We didn't know what a buck grunt was or a deer bleat was. We didn't know what a scrape was or a rub was. We just looked for poop and tracks and then just started wandering through the woods hoping to encounter one and once we never did kill a deer, but it was against the law. Mike, I mean really everybody, take a deep breath and try to grasp this insanity, which is ubiquitous in 2023.

Speaker 2:

It was against the law in michigan To hunt from an elevated position. In other words, there was some man who actually thought he had authority over other men, whether they climbed trees or not. So so I fought that law and I got rid of it. And there's been other instances when you had a concealed weapons permit which, by the way, nobody needs. Nobody needs a concealed weapon permit because we got the right to keep and bear arms from god and the constitution guarantees it. It's very existence is your concealed weapons permit.

Speaker 2:

But in michigan, they went through a bureaucracy and they infringed, like every other state, on the god given individual way to keep bear arms, and the infringement included that when you're bow hunting, even if you had a pistol permit, you couldn't carry your pistol while you were bow hunting. So some man Thought that there was a time and a place where you weren't allowed to defend yourself. So I got rid of that law and then for years you had to have your bow in a case. Now I'm just a guitar player but I know emphatically that a bow case plays no role in In conservation of wildlife whatsoever. So I thought and I got rid of that law. And there's still laws. You can't supplemental feed. You can't Relocate apples. I used to gather up a bunch of acorns from under a white oak. I gather them up and I put them over closer to a good stand right background cover and the wind was right coming from a bedding area. Well, that's perfect hunting strategy.

Speaker 2:

It's perfect because the acorn cover there and I strategically located under the oak Um because there wasn't background cover, the wind wasn't right for my ladder stand, so I'd relocate the acorns. There are bureaucrats in michigan, minnesota, wisconsin, pennsylvania who actually think they have control over a free american, whether we can relocate acorns or not. And here's my, here's my decree to those bureaucrat punks I'll relocate all the acorns I want. Keep the hell out of my life. I'll relocate corn. I'll relocate apples. It's how I strategize to responsibly harvest a reasonable surplus of deer to try to mitigate the traffic slaughter and the agriculture deprivation and the disease and the overpopulate, the habitat destruction. That's just coming from a guitar player, which means that I know more than the so-called bureaucrats in the game department. Hallelujah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I got one for you. So you see this whitetail right here. This is a Texas whitetail. Yeah, beautiful white, that's a Texas deer, isn't it? Yeah, yeah it is. I shot it down in the golden triangle. So I became aware of a law that was Rivers Republic in Texas. So I went and walked some rivers right and found you have to shoot a double odd buck shot. They actually changed this law this past year. I don't know if you're aware of this, but I am aware of it.

Speaker 1:

Yep. So I don't know if that was because of me or not, but I went and made sure the game board was where I was going to be down there. I made sure that he knew all the rules. Because I knew all the rules, I went down there with my shotgun, basically just walked this river through I mean, you know the golden triangle right Freak of nature, deer and this guy was a young deer, he's a would have been a freak of tomorrow, I think. But I went down there, shot the deer and every time I left that riverbed there was a truck waiting for me and people looking for me and trying to start fights and that warden got in trouble for doing everything he was supposed to do. I had to write multiple letters of recommendation and then of course, that whole law is gone because apparently we're not allowed to hunt our own public land here in Texas.

Speaker 2:

So it's just, it's just now. Now they're claiming that chronic wasting disease is actually hurting deer, which is a lie, because no deer herd has ever been hurt by chronic wasting disease, because it's the same exact science profile as scrapies. That has been around forever, since the 1600s. It's in the soil. They're slaughtering healthy deer and wasting that precious venison. The government, the Texas Parks and Wildlife are doing that, and here's my, here's my plea, my prayer to the game wardens and law enforcement and military please reread and re-recite your oath to the Constitution and if your boss or your commander or anybody in charge of you ever asked you or tries to force you to do to enforce a law that is illegal, immoral or against your oath to the Constitution, not only should you defy that order, you should arrest the son of a bitch for giving you an illegal, anti-constitutional, immoral order. And we I don't have to explain what that is FBI raiding people's homes who weren't even in DC on January 6th. How can an FBI agent under the sacred oath the same oath I take as a sheriff deputy for 40 years how can you piss on the oath to the Constitution and obey such an immoral command? And it's running a muck in the military, law enforcement, and especially in the game wardens of this country, and I want you to reconsider who you obey an illegal commander or your sacred oath to the Constitution. And wildlife regulations should be based on one, well two things safety and science, nothing else.

Speaker 2:

And I can go into. There's a myriad of examples of that. For example, the three-shell limit for migratory birds. I can shoot 15 doves, but I can only have three shells. What the hell do three shells have to do with a bag limit? Yeah, I could go. It's just a harassment tool. It's a harassment tool. So here in Michigan there's all kinds of nutcase laws and you're not allowed to put out a mineral block on my own farm. Well, of course I am. Nobody can tell me I can't do that. It's my property, it's my life, it's a mineral block. I'm safe in Minnesota and Pennsylvania and Illinois. So I'm a hellraiser because I'm an actual. We, the People. The founding fathers wanted every American to be just like me, suspicious of all authority, demand constitutional accountability from all of our elected employees and raise hell till we get truth, logic, common sense, constitution, bill of Rights, ten Commandments, golden Rule and we, the People as the foundation for all laws, rules and regulations.

Speaker 1:

Case closed there we go, there we go. Ted, I'm going to bring this back a little bit. You're absolutely 100% right there. But I want to tell you something that my father, on law, always told me about Sandhill Crane. I've never actually eaten one, had a shot one, but here's a recipe for you. What you do is you take basically a large like River Rock right and you throw it in the fire, you heat it up, take that and you put it inside of the Sandhill Crane, right.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah.

Speaker 1:

Cook it right. And so the rest of the recipe is the important part. He says you take that rock out and then you eat the rock. That's what he always told me about Sandhill Crane.

Speaker 2:

Well, I got to tell you I got a recipe for Sandhill Crane and my name is Ted Nugent and I'm in Michigan and I will shoot the federal migratory game bird known as the Sandhill Crane, respected as a ribeye in the sky, and no man can tell me I can't eat it. I will eat the Sandhill Crane and I have a recipe where I hang them like all fall. Texans don't seem to know this. Not many Americans know this. All fowl should be hung, just like you would hang it in your carcass or a beef carcass or a lamb or anything but a pig or a bear. You can't really age pigs or bears because the potential of trichinosis.

Speaker 2:

But a Sandhill Crane ate like a dove. You hang them by the head, don't gut them or anything. Turkey geese, pheasant, grouse, quail, hungarian partridge and certainly Sandhill Crane's. Hang them by the head in a coolie That'd be under 40 degrees, preferably 35, 38 degrees and you hang them for a week and then you skin them and then you carve out that fantastic breast meat that's just like a ribeye in the sky. And then you cook it like you would in any favorite steak or venison Okay, a lot of butter and garlic and marinated over some good hot mesquite coals. But Sandhill Crane is delicious and there's no man I've heard there's no man in the world that can tell me I have to waste a Sandhill Crane, so they might want to just kiss my ass.

Speaker 1:

Who's telling you that? That was always a joke. My father-in-law always told, and I always thought it was funny, especially because I've always heard ribeye of the sky, so I'm assuming they're delicious, I just haven't had the opportunity. But who's telling you you can't eat?

Speaker 2:

them, the government of Michigan. We finally harassed the bureaucrats. We put pressure on the bureaucrats. That's what the experiment self-government dictates, where the Sandhill Cranes were so overpopulated that they were destroying tens of millions of dollars worth of agriculture every year, and the farmers and ranchers and just concerned citizens were fed up with it. You can't protect a game bird that is overpopulated and destroying agriculture. Wild pigs come to. That has to do with all wildlife. So we finally got them to acquiesce to a degree, but the bureaucrats are all Democrats, they're all Marxists, they're all Joe Biden freaks here in Michigan, just like Texas Parks and Wildlife, I'm afraid. And so they finally allowed you to shoot the Sandhill Cranes, but the law dictates you're not allowed to consume them.

Speaker 2:

Well, that's unethical, that's immoral. Isn't it immoral to kill a game animal and let it rot in the field? That's the law in Michigan. These people have lost their minds. So I let you kill them, but they eat them. It says you cannot consume them. It's unbelievable.

Speaker 2:

That's Gretchen Whitmer and her lesbian attorney general and I'm a big fan of lesbians, not when they're idiots, though, dana Nessle. They literally have a law here that it's a felony if you mispronounce someone. So if I see a guy with a beard and a skirt. I'm going to go hey, sir, how are you today? Which would be a felony. I'm telling you, mike, the country has lost its soul. But if you find a campfire surrounded by hunting families, you have found the best people in the world. And I got to tell you. If I have a little more attitude than some people can handle, it's because every week in September, october, into November, I have a hunting ranch here in Michigan called Sunrise Safar. We got these wild pigs, we got some great deer, we got some goats and some rams, and every week and I share a campfire with 10 to 20 great great American families and we shoot and kill and butcher hogs and take photos. And there's a lot of beer around the campfire I drink actually I'm drinking tonic water. Again, I have nothing against beer until you have two or three and you start being a drooling Aussie idiot, but it's so refreshing so I have way too much confidence. That is a result of the greatest people in the world that I share a campfire with all hunting season and I've been.

Speaker 2:

I started Sunrise Safaris back in what was it? Maybe 1990, 91, because people were bombarding me with questions Well, how do I get into hunting? What kind of gun, what kind of bullet should I get? Where can I go? And I always guide them to sporting good stores that I have friends at that have proven to be friendly, conscientious and positive and encouraging and and knowledgeably guiding people into this wonderful lifestyle. And so those people are now gung-ho hunters and fishermen and trappers too, and every weekend Sunrise Safaris all my hunts are sold out throughout the year. We're already booking for 2024.

Speaker 2:

And I bring a guitar and I play some hunting songs and we have some BS sessions and we talk about, you know, music and and guitar tones and horsepower and politics, and favorite firearms and favorite ammo and favorite bows and arrows. It's really the ultimate shit kicker, positive, real America experience. And it's all those people they're listening to this. You people that I've been blessed to share these campfires with, you're my inspiration. You remind me that the greatest, kindest, most confident, hardworking, positive, funny, cocky people in the world are still alive and well and they're in the hunting camps of this country.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. We you and I jumped into this podcast real hot, but I usually tell everyone of my guests that I want this to be like I'm joining your hunting camp. We're sitting around a fire. I want you to tell your stores exactly how you would tell them. I don't care who's listening. I want you to have fun telling your stories, because that's what I love to hear and I love to be around those campfire. So I'm with you 100%, Ted. It's, it's it's. My favorite place in the world is just being around that campfire.

Speaker 2:

It is the favorite.

Speaker 2:

I have a real America voice camp, a spirit campfire podcast.

Speaker 2:

Every week People go to realamericavoicecom, I guess, but it's called the spirit campfire because I don't have a teleprompter, I don't have a script, I don't have anybody giving me ideas. I just talk about the things I believe in in a 75 year accumulation of information and evidence and and dreams and hopes and good people and bad people. And so, yeah, campfire is the most unfiltered, honest celebration of people who are unafraid because, all of a sudden, all the shackles and all the fears and all the cancel culture and all political correctness and all this insanity that runs the US government right now in media and academia and Hollywood and the and the drag queen insanity that has just destroyed the fiber of our spiritual soul in America that vanishes around a spirit campfire. So, everybody listening, make sure that you invite as many family and friends as you can, as often as you can, to as many campfires as you can, because it will cleanse the soul and remind us how good people are, and the best people in the world will be found around a hunting campfire.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely, absolutely. You couldn't be more correct on that, ted. I'm going to bring us back a little bit more again. We're here to hear some stories, and I know we've gone a little bit on a side rail here, but why don't you? I don't know if you have another story you want to share. Maybe you know a memorable one with your dad, or maybe one from this season, but I'll make sure you get a couple more stories in.

Speaker 2:

I'll give you another hunting story. My son, fleetwood, was born on October 28, 1968, to my girlfriend, sally and I, and we were two young teenagers that weren't ready to raise a child. So we put Fleetwood up for adoption with the Catholic Charity in Manhattan and one of the other concerns was that the records would be sealed and that we had to give up our child to be raised by a caring parent through the Catholic Charity, which I virtually virtually distrust to this day. But I did know better back then. Well, 42 years later, another daughter of mine found Fleetwood. Wow, fleetwood had no idea who his dad was. He was raised by a great, great woman, a merry man in Manhattan, new York. Fleetwood had never fired a gun, had never thought about killing his own food and had actually voted for Barack Obama. But when we met it was very emotional. It was an instant father, son love and connection and he couldn't wait to try his hand in the great outdoors. It's amazing, it's in the blood.

Speaker 2:

In Manhattan I'm a sheriff deputy so I carry a gun everywhere because I helped pass the House Resolution 218, we're all law enforcement can carry nationwide. What a concept. So I have some US Marshall friends who I actually do raids with in Texas, I do federal raids against murderers and rapists and carjackers and child molesters. Boy, that's a whole another story for a whole another podcast. I got a hold of a couple of my US Marshall buddies in New York City and I wanted to introduce Fleetwood to the joys of aim, small, miss, small marksmanship. Well, my US Marshall buddies thought, all right, let's teach Ted's son the joys of marksmanship. So they brought down a couple of MP5 fully automatic submachine guns to a pistol range in New York City and we, we, we commence to unleash brass rainbow of taxpayer ammo. And so that that is not a hunting story per se but it's a baptism, only only Ted Nugent's son can be introduced to guns with federal machine guns.

Speaker 2:

Well then, it was shortly after that that he came to our farm in Michigan and he, you know, in order to become efficient with a bow and arrow, whether it's a compound or long bore recurve, it's still handheld drawback. And that hand-eye coordination and the touch and the release, whether it's fingers or a tab or a release or whatever you might use, it, takes a lot of preparation. But with a crossbow you can become efficient. If you're good with a firearm, you can become real efficient within a couple dozen arrows Once you sight it in. So I got Fleetwood shooting the crossbow and he was shooting dead on out to 30, 40 yards.

Speaker 2:

So we went into the woods and went to a blind that I've had here since the 70s and it was the few days before the firearm season and we got in a shadow hunter, blind, over the edge of a magnificent swamp and this giant doe came wandering by in a little food plot that I had put out some rye and wheat and oats before. I discovered, you know, some of these wonderful mad scientist commercial food plot like the Buck Forage oats that we use now. And this doe come out about 30 yards and I'm filming for the Spirited Wild TV show that's on the Pursuit Network. And Fleetwood is just as cool and calm. He was a restaurateur, so he was a work, ethic and discipline and his focus he was a real man's man, a husband and a father and a great son, and just as cool, calm and collected.

Speaker 2:

His first encounter with a whitetail which can be very, very exasperating, I think Buck Fever, a target panic. But Fleetwood didn't feel any of that. He we had practiced on a 3D target so we knew exactly where the crease was where that arrow was supposed to the bolt's supposed to go. And sure enough, he drilled that doe. But I had Buck Fever. I was. I moved the camera so wildly that we couldn't tell where it was hitting. That bolt coming out of that X caliber, I don't know, was doing 400 feet a second or something and he lost. Even with the Illuminaq on it, he lost track.

Speaker 2:

He goes. Did I get him? Did I get her? And I go, I don't know. And so we went down and looked. We couldn't find anything. I'm going, maybe he goes, maybe I shot under her Great story that we made a big circle and sure enough, not 40 yards from where she stood, there's this beautiful big swamp donkey that he shot right through the top of the heart. And it was a great, great moment. It harkened back to my first deer and I immediately got ahold of my dad and my brothers, my mom and everybody to celebrate my first kill in 1968. And, and it was an emotional tsunami, yeah, and bugged, and it was emotional, it's amazing.

Speaker 2:

And he's now a dedicated hunter. His two daughters have a bow and arrow and his wife Danielle. They want to all come out to the swamp this fall. So he, he comes out every year, become a tradition where we connect. He's in New York and I'm in, I live in Texas and we have their Michigan swamp. So that's that's an example story of what it means, what it means to us, that you can start late but your instinct will drive you.

Speaker 2:

Especially as a rent rent restaurant tourer, he's got to make sure that all that beef and pork and all that lamb and all that fish is fresh. Well, he immediately grasped and celebrated you want fresh, kill it yourself. That's the ultimate. So he's become the master chef of wild game and of course, you can't sell it at any restaurant but he does provide it for his close friends with his as a master chef. It is. It's called the Richmond in Staten Island, new York. It's just a renowned, famous restaurant because of the quality and detail to the culinary celebration.

Speaker 2:

And so that's a great story about Fleetwood and I and he's still got his family in New York and now his daughter's going to school. Emma is in Lansing, michigan, going to Michigan University, and we're all going to get together. But that's another example. That's a beautiful example of what's the hunting instinct purity. The hunting instinct is pure and it will bring you back together and he can't wait to get back here. My daughter Sasha, my daughter Louisa, my daughter Heather, my daughter Chantel, my son Toby, who was just here a minute ago, my son Rocco, my son Fleetwood. It's a great calling that we all get together and it's about the hunting season.

Speaker 1:

That's amazing, that's amazing, and so was that hunt.

Speaker 2:

That went well. He was 42,. He's now 54 years ago. It had to be in the early 2000s maybe, no late 90s maybe, but since then it's become an annual. That's amazing and he loved it. And here's a New York City guy who can't wait to head for the swamp and get in the blind with his dad. So that's pretty damn special.

Speaker 1:

It is pretty special. I was thinking like, oh man, he lived in New York, I wonder how this is going to go, but it's awesome that he just embraced the entire experience. I want to say that everyone should try it, because I think most people would embrace it. But then you can't everybody hunting. That wouldn't work. But here's another one for you, ted. I have a question for you and maybe you have an answer. So my wife, she loves that I'm a hunter, she loves that I go out there and that I have this hobby versus many other things that a lot of men in America are doing right now. But she wants nothing to do with death, she doesn't want to see it. We live outside of city limits in New Bromphil, so we've got lots of deer and technically I can shoot them. She's like I don't want you to kill anything at my house. What's your advice to get my wife to become a little bit more open to being involved in the experience, versus just letting me go off and doing it and then bringing me home?

Speaker 2:

Well, I'll give you an example. When I met Shemayne in October of 88 doing my radio show in Detroit, she was the traffic gal and we hit it off and we got married that next January and she had never gone fishing or hunting, never touched a gun or a bow, and she didn't know anything about my, shall we say, gonzo advocacy for the Second Amendment and the conservation lifestyle. And so if we just lived and she knew that hunting season came and Mike, I hunt every day. My tours always end before September and I hunt Every day. If it's a nasty storm I'll go duck hunting. I hunt Every day September, october, november, december, january, february of the MLD season, right up to March in Texas Then, of course. Then I hunt exotic year-round and I trap year-round and I varmint hunt year-round. So even with, you know, 50 days of touring, I did 34 concerts in 44 days this year. It always ends in time to hunt Every day. And she had expressed in our early relationship that I would come home with a bone area, come home with nothing most of the time, but I, around the dinner table, I would exalt the sandhill cranes that flew right in front of my face, the Pallated woodpecker that hit the tree right above my head, the cedar wax wing that landed right on the the Autumn olive bushes right in front of me, and the cardinals that one day a green jay in Texas landed right on my arrow. Because I really, if I dare say, mastered Stationary stealth with the bow and arrow because I don't want to alert anything or anybody. And she goes. You know, you're, you're, you're so happy. Every day you come in from hunting but you didn't get anything. You didn't kill anything. I go up killing Last a couple seconds. I mean my stand for four hours Every morning and every afternoon and I passed up a couple of little young bucks, which is not easy for me to do, but I don't kill the young bucks anymore, and so she goes. I just didn't know that's what that was all about. And she Wanted to try her hand at the bow and arrow just for archery, because she saw what a joy I was having. And she became an incredible archer within the first year. And then she wanted to learn about firearms safety because the engineered recidivism of increased crime by a failed justice system. She wanted to be capable of defending herself and then, when Rockett was born in 90, she wanted to be sure she could protect her son. Well, she finally said One real warm October day, how about if I go sit in a blight? My point being I didn't push her. I said you know, you can come with me. And she did come with me.

Speaker 2:

We started the spirit of the wild television on public television in 1989 and she saw when this perfect fresh pork chop came from. She saw where this incredible backstrap came from. She saw that not only art squirrels icky, but they're healthier, cleaner and more delicious than any chicken that you're gonna buy. And so she finally, on her own, went. I think I could try that, yeah, but she also has a little unique twist to it. She won't shoot a doe, but we I have to shoot 40 or 50 does. Just on our Michigan swamp and on our Texas ranch I have to shoot at least a dozen or more does. So I keep expressing as gentlemanly as possible honey. It would be Irresponsible and bad for the health of the ecosystem and the deer herd if we don't kill some does. And they have a wonderful backstrap and it's about Balance and a responsible management science program. So I've got a real close now with a couple of new Tank blinds from Fort Worth, texas, where she's real comfortable, even when the weather isn't nice and comfy for her. So she's ready to make that plunge and shoot a doe, but she's, she's deadly. I'm telling you. If she's got her, she got a little pink.

Speaker 2:

30 pound, matthews, 30 pounds everybody. Yes, she kills everything with 30 Pounds and a two blade steel forest broad head that is scary sharp and she waits for their leg to go forward and she shoots them all in the crease. 600 pound Cymeter horn, oryx. 30 pound bow, in and out. Wow, 350 pound. Auddad ramen old, old, 33 inch Auddad Ram. 30 pound bow, 400 grain. Gold tip, arrow, razor, sharp, two blade steel for in and out. We watch Everything she shoots. Die right there it's.

Speaker 2:

Don't get her to just try archery. I think she'll, as long as you can find a lightweight bow that she does not have to struggle. It's got to be graceful and effortless or they're not gonna do it and that's why so many guys are going to crossbows, because they can't draw their 70 pound bow anymore, which you don't need a 70 pound bow for Anything. Fred bear killed elephant with 75. I've killed Kate Buffalo with 55. I shoot a 46 pound brand new Matthews image bow. 46 pounds, same, 400 grain. It go tip arrow that Toby and Shaman and I all shoot and I I kill over a hundred deer a year. I shoot another 50, 60 exotics. I killed maybe a hundred hogs and 46 pounds.

Speaker 2:

Everybody is grunting and groaning, hurting their shoulders, stopping the bow hunt and going to a crossbow. And I, if you want to shoot a crossbow, that's fine, but most of the decisions to shoot a crossbow is because they're over bowed poundage. They're trying to draw back too much poundage and still be stealthy and graceful. So the point is, I think the best way to get your wife into it is go to the range with 22 and have her discover the joys of the hand-eye coordination aim small, miss small marksmanship, just on targets and get her a bow and arrow. I believe she fall in love with a bow and arrow. Even it's right in the backyard, 10 feet Archery is still archery at 10 feet because it's left hand, right hand, breathing, sight acquisition, moment of truth, trigger, execution. It doesn't matter if it's 10 feet or 20 yards, but it's the archery experience. She'll fall in love with that and then very gentlemanly explained to her that it's just Irresponsible not to kill deer because if you don't kill a Reasonable and proven, scientific based number of deer. They will be slammed by a Buick, they will be. They will die from a coyote, they will die from disease.

Speaker 2:

We are under harvesting deer across this country now. I'm not under harvest Every day and I got a lot of do tags on our wild swamp here in Michigan. I have a high fence down the road where I have to shoot a certain amount. We should talk about high fence hunting to at some point because I can't believe the runaway ignorance and Inbreeding and cannibalism in our own sport Against high fence hunting. Because I've been bow hunting my whole life and I have a set of Central rules that when we hunt the wild 1200 acre swamp I have to abide by these bow hunting rules. If I want to kill a deer, the same rules apply in my 300 acre high fence right place, right time.

Speaker 2:

Nobody uses a fence to corner a deer. The fence has no control whether the deer shows up or not. You still got to use the wind, you got to use the sun. You got to have silhouette breaking cover. You got to aim small, miss small. You got to draw slowly and carefully, except at the King Ranch, the Kennedy Ranch, the East Ranch, because South Texas have the dumbest deer on the planet, which are my year in the world to hunt, because I deserve a dumb deer once in a while. The point being is that those free range South Texas deer are Dumber and more relaxed than a button buck in Michigan, so there's a lot of squawking in our own sport. That's not fair chase. All my hunting is 100% fair chase because all the game I kill didn't have to come to me. They have all kinds of terrain they could have gone.

Speaker 2:

I had to strategize, whether it's the the Manistee National Forest or it's my high fence in Texas or in Michigan, and I killed 90% of my deer an open ground. But they're. The deer on open ground have to be killed. We have to harvest the surplus. The same science applies to a high fence operation. Now there are some high fences. In fact, there and not far from you in the Hill Country, there are deer that eat out of people's hands on open ground. Oh yeah, so if you want venison, I suppose you don't need to kill it with a ball peen hammer, and you want to have deer in the backyard because they're beautiful and they're fun to get close to. But would that be unethical to put a tree stand in the backyard and maybe shoot a nice popin young buck that's following a dumb doe up your garage.

Speaker 2:

See, there's a lot of points that I know these are about stories, but I'd like to think this is about a campfire Awakening story that hunters have to support choices like the buckshot rule. First of all, the buckshot rule is just insane. Your average trajectory, double, odd or triple odd or number one or number four buck, there's no difference between that and a slug here, especially if you're shooting down towards the grad it's center. There's so many ballistic realities that the game departments are totally ignorant of. But I'd like to think that on this podcast, mike, the stories that we share Emphasize the joys that we have in our individual choices on what we do in the great outdoors.

Speaker 2:

I have a scope 208 sniper rifle. I can kill anything out to probably a thousand yards because I get to train with the seals and the Rangers and the Delta Force guys and they've taught me to shoot long range. But I'd rather see how close I can get. And I do shoot a couple of deer a year at my buddy's place in Uvalde Because I'm not intimate with the terrain. I don't know exactly where to set tree stands sometimes. So I'll get on a promenade and I'll shoot deer at long range, which again is 100% Fair chase, 100% legitimate and ethical and righteous and science-based. And.

Speaker 2:

But we, as hunters, we have to support Everybody's choice. Deer need to die. Deer need to be eaten. Deer numbers need to be reduced on an annual basis, based on population dynamics, carrying capacity of the habitat and other considerations unique to each Topographical location. But the point is, if you want to use a scope 300 weatherbee, I love you. If you want to use an open site Muzzle loader, I love you. If one is a crossbow, I love you. One he's a lumbar, I love you. If you're Levi Morgan and you can out shoot me at a hundred yards that I can shoot at ten yards, I love him even more. So we have to take a deep breath and and quit Criticize and if not downright condemning our fellow sportsmen Based on the choice. Deer need to die. And what would ever encourage more participation, more family hours of recreation and more revenues generated while we balance the herds every year? That's the only goal, I think we should all unite on, I agree.

Speaker 1:

And if hunters aren't doing it, then the government's going to do it, and they're going to use our taxes.

Speaker 2:

Yes, any time you compromise access by we, the people. The USDA comes in with shooters that are paid with our tax dollars. That's the alternative. Who could possibly?

Speaker 1:

allow that to happen not me, yep. The animals will get overpopulated and we'll start hitting them with cars and then people will start complaining. And then all of a sudden, we're paying for it rather than well, hunters aren't paying for it through tags. Yeah, all taxpayers are paying for it through taxes, which is absolutely ridiculous. But to go back a little bit, I know we're jumping around a little bit, but as far as my wife, she actually has connections with Bear Archery the company, so I will get her, oh good.

Speaker 1:

And I have a four-year-old and yesterday him and I went and shot. His arrows can't even penetrate the target, but we went out and shot for 45 minutes, just him and me, with mom watching, and I can tell that I was digging through the wall that she's put up about this whole thing. So I think that you're 100% right. I'm going to get my wife into Archery, but I'm definitely going to get my son into Archery and my daughter when she's old enough. She's only one, but, yeah, that advice is great, ted.

Speaker 2:

So, thank you, we're running on time All my grandkids started shooting bows and arrows by the time they were two or three and of course you got to really get a real mushy. The recurve is the best or the Genesis I think Matthew is the creator of the Genesis bow and they make the youth version, which is absolutely effortless, just mushy and to have her user fingers at first. Make sure that you have feather fletching, not plastic fletching, because plastic fletching will kick off the shelf or the arrow rest on those types of bows, but get them real close to that target. And a bale of straw is the best because you want the arrow to stick and you just put a little paper plate with a little black mark in the middle and have them stand just 10 feet. So they discover where is my hand-eye coordination pointing, where is that arrow pointing like a finger? And they'll always shoot high at the beginning because they're putting the tip of the arrow where they want to hit and of course that's going upwards. They'll discover what that gap is. But every bow hunter would be well rewarded if they started with a recurve or a longbow fingers and feather-fletched arrows at 10 feet, at a bale of straw, maybe just a little piece of tape about the size of your fist, so they will learn what the next arrow should be. That one was pointed there and went high, and they will shoot until you have to go.

Speaker 2:

Ok, time's up. We need to go to bed now, because people fall in love with the origins of Zen, which is the mystical flight of the arrow, because as you can control your arrow, we'll indicate if you can control your life. So I wish you Godspeed. But the point, the most important point, it's got to be a bow that has no struggle whatsoever. It should come back like the Hunger Games. You watch those people shoot. That's a must. They're probably shooting a 10-pound bow for video. A 10-pound kids bow will fling an arrow.

Speaker 1:

That's archery, it's the process, that's perfect. Well, ted, I know we're running out of time and I don't want to take you away from the other things you got for the day. I say this to everybody, but if you've got more stories, I'm going to listen to them. Otherwise, you can go ahead and tell people if you've got anything you want to mention. I know Shemaine's got some stuff going on. You have your. I don't know if it's a podcast or your show, but if there's whatever you want to share, please feel free right now, and then we'll wrap this thing up.

Speaker 2:

Well, mike, I think, have your wife and all you guys out there, get your women in your life to watch Shemaine Nugent's Real America's Voice, faith and Freedom. Real America's Voice, faith and Freedom. I have a Real America Voice spirit campfire. But we celebrate rugged individualism, truth, logic, common sense, god, family, country, constitution, bill of rights, 10 Commandments, golden Rule, declaration of Independence, law and order, good over evil, good will and decency and the purity of the conservation, hunting, fishing, trapping lifestyle. I also are celebrating our 34th year of Ted Nugent's Spirit of the Wild on the Pursuit Channel. It's on eight times a week and I have a funny feeling we've got the evidence to prove it that when the women watch Shemaine's Queen of the Forest segments, they see what a joy it is, how stimulating, how there's a certain effervescence to a woman with a weapon, and the Queen of the Forest segment on Spirit of the Wild TV for these last 34 years has turned so many gals onto this outdoor lifestyle. So everybody, get your families to watch Spirit of the Wild and watch Shemaine's Queen of the Forest segments.

Speaker 2:

We also have TedNugentcom, since I've been banned and unpublished from Facebook because I violate their community standards, which means that truth, logic and common sense is kryptonite to idiots. But if people would go to TedNugentcom, I have a bunch of flags and hats that say I will not comply. And in this world of corruption and criminality by our government, the media, big tech in Hollywood and Anheuser-Busch and Target and all the Satanists out there, we're fighting back and I'm doing media every day. But if people would go to TedNugentcom, you can see what we're up to, what's going on and I would welcome people to join us. I want to thank everybody too, mike, because Spirit of the Wild has been a top TV show. It started on the Outdoor Channel, we're now on the Pursuit Channel eight times a week and it's been a top rated show because people love honesty. We don't produce Spirit of the Wild, we just push the record button and we capture the way real hunters go hunting and we thank everybody for their support.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I will put links to all of that in the show notes, ted. Thank you so much, man. This was a lot of fun. I really appreciate you taking time from your day. I never expected I'd have someone like yourself on the podcast, but I had a lot of fun today, so thank you.

Speaker 2:

Well, I appreciate it, mike. We're blood brothers, we're great spirit of the great outdoors, fred Bear blood brothers. So God bless Texas. Let's make sure that we're putting pressure on the Texas Parks and Wildlife because they're out of control right now. They're guilty of criminal behavior in the wanton ways of good, healthy deer that are being slaughtered and buried for no good reason whatsoever.

Speaker 2:

So if people would go out In fact I think we have a link at TedNugentcom, but we got a bunch of people that are fighting back and we think we can stop these jackboot of thugs. They're not even Texans. The people in charge of Texas Parks and Wildlife, they're not even Texans, they're from New Jersey. So there's a lot of battles that need to be fought and I thank everybody that does do that. And I'm having the greatest hunting season of my life. I hope you all do, and since you're in New Braunfels, texas, I got a bunch of buddies out there. People have way too many Axis deer in that area and I'm willing to help. So let's play together at some point. I'll track you down through my Linda and maybe we'll rendezvous at some point this winter.

Speaker 1:

Oh, that'd be amazing. Yeah, I've got one Axis deer that runs through my yard, Just one doe and I've got her on game camera. But yeah, again got to get through the wife issue before I can take that one down. So there are plenty.

Speaker 2:

Look with that, but keep at it.

Speaker 1:

Don't give up, man, I will. I will Thank you again, sir. I appreciate your time. You bet man. God bless.

Speaker 2:

Godspeed Good hunting forever. Thank you.

Speaker 1:

All right, guys, that's it. Another couple stories in the books. Again, I want to thank Ted Mr Nugent for coming on the podcast. He couldn't have done this without him. He obviously has a ton of energy and is extremely passionate about everything to do with the outdoors. So, sir, thank you. Hopefully some people fed off of your energy during this podcast. Please do make sure you check out the links in the show notes, because he's doing a lot of cool stuff. He's wrapped up his final tour so it might be hard to see and play his music but, that being said, he's doing a lot of cool things. He's got a good show. His wife's got some good shows. All the links, again, are in the show notes.

Speaker 1:

Beyond that, everyone, if you could please share the podcast with one person, I would greatly appreciate it. The best way that we're going to get more people hearing the Hunting Stories podcast and having more people reaching out saying man, I got a crazy story to tell is by the listeners sharing it with at least one person. If you can do that for us, we'd appreciate it. Beyond that, if you can review it, great. If not, whatever, that's cool too. Thank you, guys again for tuning in. I appreciate all of you, I'll go out there and make some stories, Thank you.

Ted Nugent Shares Hunting Stories
Inspiration and Hunting Journey
Hunting, Campfires, and Lost Soul
Father and Son's Reunion and Hunting
Hunting and Archery for Wildlife Management
Deer Hunting and Archery Tips
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